8 Tips on Keeping Your Dog Healthy this Spring

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8 Tips on Keeping Your Dog Healthy this Spring

From Allergies to Bees, Know How to Protect Your Pet

Spring time is so much fun because Pepper and I hang out in the backyard.  I’m usually gardening, tending to my roses.  Pepper is usually running up and down the yard with her ball or barking at the neighbor’s cat.  As dog parents, it’s important that we pay attention to our four legged friend when she or he is outside during this weather change.  For instance, dogs can have seasonal allergies, just like us humans.  I wanted to share some tips on how to care for our furry loved ones as we start a new season filled with fresh cut grass, new blooms, and buzzing insects.

Protect Your Dog from the Critters

Keeping your dog up to date with his or her flea, tick and heart-worm prevention is very important.  Spring and Summer, those little critters are out and about just waiting to feast on our paw friends.  Protect your pet’s health!  I visit Pepper’s vet for X flea and tick medication, where I drop the solution on her neck or base of spine (start of tail).

 

It’s Easter Time, So Keep Your Chocolates to Yourself.

For some of you, the Easter Bunny will visit your household and bring chocolate sweets to your family. Please remember to keep your pups away from chocolate, as the acid in sugary treats like chocolate can be deadly.  If your dog consumes chocolate, please consult your veterinarian immediately for assistance.

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Chomping on Greens

It’s okay if your dog eats grass. However, you should take note that if your dog is eating grass, it usually means that he or she has an upset stomach.  Grass soothes their stomach and helps with the nausea, sometimes naturally inducing vomiting.    Now, if your dog is eating grass, and the grass is treated with chemicals (e.g., TrueGreen, etc.), do NOT allow your dog to eat the chemically treated grass!  Again, if this happens, contact your veterinarian immediately.  Always read labels, when conducting or treating lawn care, and determine if it’s safe for your pet.  If not, keep your dog clear of those outside areas.

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Got the Itch?

My cousin previously had a Yorkshire Terrier who developed a skin disease where he was constantly itching and irritated.  Poor thang.  It was finally determined by his veterinarian that the little guy was actually allergic to grass.  I’ve also had dogs that get watery eyes and sneezing when they’re outside for too long, thanks to the pollen in the air.  My vet allows my dog to have half a Benadryl (it is dependent on weight size); however, this makes her sleepy).  If your dog is suffering from seasonal allergies, speak to your veterinarian about allowing your dog to take Antihistamines.

 

No Chasing the Bees, Please.

My cousin previously had a Yorkshire Terrier who developed a skin disease where he was constantly itching and irritated.  Poor thang.  It was finally determined by his veterinarian that the little guy was actually allergic to grass.  I’ve also had dogs that get watery eyes and sneezing when they’re outside for too long, thanks to the pollen in the air.  My vet allows my dog to have half a Benadryl (it is dependent on weight size); however, this makes her sleepy).  If your dog is suffering from seasonal allergies, speak to your veterinarian about allowing your dog to take Antihistamines.

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All the Pretty Flowers.

I have my outdoor rose garden, but I also have an indoor plant that I keep in the living room.  It’s very important that you monitor your pups, making sure that they do not eat your plants and/or flowers, as they may be toxic to our furry friends. 

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Tag, You’re It.

Keep collar tags up to date in case your loved one breaks free and makes a run for it.

Your neighbors’ furry friends are also out to play.  If your pup is a little advantageous, he or she may try to go say hi.  Unless your dog is well trained or in an enclosed space, keep him or her on a leash and make sure his or her tag is up to date with an updated address or phone number.

 

Don’t Overdue It.

Some people think that since their dog was inactive all Winter, that they should go jog a mile at a local park.  Whatever you do, don’t over exert your dog as you don’t want them to become overheated or exhausted.  Just as you would build up yourself to be a runner, the same goes for your pet.  Maybe do light strolls, when you’re first getting back outside, and increase over time, monitoring your dog’s energy levels.

 

Are there any additional preventive measures that you dog moms and dads use, that aren’t listed above? If so, don’t forget to comment so we can use those tips as well!

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